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Eye Movements and Other Cognitive Cues to Rehearsed and Unrehearsed Deception When Interrogated about a Mock Crime

Description: Accurate lie detection is crucial for fighting terrorism and for advancing justice. New theoretically-undergirded methods are needed to replace the polygraph-based Control Question Test (National Research Council, 2003). We tested a promising one in a mock crime, Time Restricted Integrity-Confirmation (Walczyk et al., 2005), which selectively induces cognitive load on liars. Also, for the first time, the effects of rehearsal, a likely load-reducing countermeasure, were assessed on the cognitive cues of response times, answer wordiness and consistency, eye movement, and pupil dilation. After "stealing" money during a job interview, participants were randomly assigned to either a truth telling, an unrehearsed lying, or a rehearsed lying condition and then were interrogated. Among the important findings were that truthful answers to multiple-response questions (versus yes/no) were quicker than deceptive answers. Liars had wordier answers, especially when rehearsed, and more inconsistencies. Truth tellers had the fewest eye movements and rehearsed liars had the most, suggesting that liars may be able to reduce cognitive load by briefly breaking eye contact with another. Discriminant analyses revealed liar-truth teller classification accuracies from 67% to 84%, with few false positives.

Suggested Citation:
Walczyk, J.J., Griffith, D.A., Yates, R., Visconte, S., & Simoneaux. B. (2013). Eye Movements and Other Cognitive Cues to Rehearsed and Unrehearsed Deception When Interrogated about a Mock Crime [Electronic Version]. Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice, 9(1), 1-23.

Keywords: deception and cognition, cognitive lie detection, eye movements and lying

Date: May 13, 2013 | File Size: 329.83 Kb | Downloads: 2624

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